Our Team

The WIIS team is comprised of dedicated thought leaders who are committed to advancing the role of women in the field of international peace and security. At WIIS we truly believe these women will be one of the keys to advancing peace and security in the 21st century.

Chantal de Jonge Oudraat

President
Chantal de Jonge Oudraat

President

Dr. Chantal de Jonge Oudraat is President of Women in International Security (WIIS) since February 2013.

She was the founding and executive director of the Stockholm International Peace Research Institute (SIPRI) North America (2012-2014).  Previous positions include: senior advisor to the U.S. Institute of Peace Center for Gender and Peacebuilding; associate vice president and director of the U.S. Institute of Peace Jennings Randolph Fellowship Program;  adjunct associate professor at the Edmund A. Walsh School of Foreign Service, Georgetown University; and senior fellow at the Center for Transatlantic Relations, Paul H. Nitze School of Advanced International Studies, Johns Hopkins University. She has also held senior positions at the Carnegie Endowment for International Peace in Washington, DC; and the United Nations Institute for Disarmament Research (UNIDIR) in Geneva.

Her areas of specialization are: women, peace and security, gender, international organizations, arms control and disarmament, terrorism and countering violent extremism, peacekeeping, use of force, economic sanctions, U.S.-European relations.

Dr. de Jonge Oudraat is co-editor of The Gender and Security Agenda: Promoting Equality and Peace in the 21st Century (forthcoming 2019); Women and War: Power and Protection in the 21st Century (USIP Press, 2011); and Managing Global Issues: Lessons Learned (Carnegie Endowment, 2001).

 

Other recent publications include: “ WPS+GPS: Adding Gender to the Peace and Security Equation,” WIIS Policy Brief (November 2017); “Women, Gender and Terrorism: The Missing Links, WIIS Policy Brief (August, 2016); “Preventing and Countering Violent Extremism: the Role of Women and Women’s Organizations” in A Man’s World (CGCS and Hedayah Center, 2016); “Women In Combat: Learning from Cultural Support Teams,” WIIS Policy Brief, (August, 2015);  The 1325 Scorecard-Gender Mainstreaming: Indicators for the Implementation of UNSCR 1325 and its Related Resolutions (NATO/WIIS, 2015); “Peace and Security in the 21st Century: Understanding the Gendered Nature of Power” in Managing Conflict in a World Adrift (USIP Press, 2015); UNSCR 1325: “Conundrums and Opportunities,” International Interactions, (No.4, 2013);“Mostly Sunny, Partly Cloudy-The transatlantic forecast for the next four years,” Atlantisch Perspectief, (No. 8, 2012);   ”Play it Again, Uncle Sam: Transatlantic Relations, NATO and the European Union” in Rewiring Regional Security in a Fragmented World (USIP Press, 2011).

De Jonge Oudraat did her undergraduate studies at the University of Amsterdam and received her PhD in Political Science from the University of Paris II (Panthéon).

She is a Dutch and US national.

Ellen Haring

Senior Fellow
Ellen Haring

Senior Fellow

Dr. Ellen Haring is a senior fellow at Women in International Security where she directs the Combat Integration Initiative. Haring’s research and work focus on women and gender in the military. She is a West Point graduate and a retired U.S. Army colonel. She holds a Ph.D. in Conflict Analysis and Resolution and she has taught at the US Army Command and General Staff College, the US Army War College, and Georgetown University. Haring has published numerous articles and papers on a wide array of military and security related topics. She has been a guest speaker on foreign and domestic news shows. She guest lectures and has testified before Congress.

Haring’s publications include:

“Make Women Register for the Draft” US News and World Report (June 22, 2016)
“Integration of Women Depends on Male Leaders” Army Times (May 2, 2016)
“Our Military Shouldn’t Turn Its Back on Servicewomen Who Need an Abortion” Huffington Post (April 30, 2016)
“Give Women All of the Rights of Citizenship, Including Selective Service” Task and Purpose (February 26, 2016)
“That Valor Isn’t Yours to Defend” Task and Purpose (March 18, 2015)
“Is the Marine Corps Setting Women Up to Fail in Combat Roles?” Cicero Magazine (February 18, 2015)
“Civilian leaders need to lead on women in combat,” The Hill Congress Blog, (February 5, 2015)
“A Snapshot: Two Years in to Combat Integration,” Women in International Security, (January 30, 2015)
“Dear Berkeley women: It’s time to lead the next revolution,” The Daily Californian, (August 26, 2014)
“The Sea of Sameness in PME” Joint Forces Quarterly (July 2014)
“Deck Stacked Against Women in Experimental Task Force” Marine Corps Times (July 6, 2014)
“Can Women Be Infantry Marines” War on the Rocks (May 29, 2014)
“Do Military Women Want Combat Jobs” Foreign Policy (April 24, 2014)
“Combat Integration: Good but not good enough” The Army Times (January 2014)
“Rangers are NOT Leading the Way” Foreign Policy (January 2014)
“A Col’s View of Commander’s Authority” Foreign Policy (September 2013)
“Women and the Audie Murphy Model,” Armed Forces Journal (August 2013)
“What Women Bring to the Fight,” Parameters, US Army War College (Summer 2013)
“To Stop Sexual Assault in the Military Add More Women,” Christian Science Monitor (June 24, 2013)
“The Army’s Disservice to Women,” The Washington Post (June 21, 2013)
“Insights from the Women in Combat Symposium,” Joint Forces Quarterly (June 2013)

Antonieta Rico

WIIS Fellow
Antonieta Rico

WIIS Fellow

Antonieta Rico is a fellow at Women in International Security. She holds a Master of Science degree in Foreign Service from Georgetown University. Rico served for more than six years in the U.S. Army as a public affairs specialist/military journalist. She deployed to Iraq twice and embedded with infantry units during combat operations and day-to-day missions. She has worked as Deputy News Editor of Army Times and Navy Times reporting on training, deployment cycles, combat integration and quality of life issues. Her academic and professional focus is on the intersection of gender, security and the military.

Jeannette Gaudry Haynie

Senior Fellow
Jeannette Gaudry Haynie

Senior Fellow

Jeannette Gaudry Haynie is a Senior Fellow at Women in International Security (WIIS). She is a 1998 graduate of the United States Naval Academy. She currently serves as a Lieutenant Colonel in the United States Marine Corps Reserves, assigned to the Headquarters Marine Corps Strategic Initiatives Group, and is also a PhD candidate at the George Washington University writing her dissertation. An AH-1W Cobra attack helicopter pilot by trade who served through multiple overseas deployments in a variety of billets, she earned her MA in Political Science in 2011 from the University of New Orleans. She writes regular blog posts for the United States Naval Institute, the professional journal of the sea services, and has been published in Proceedings as well as quoted and interviewed in a variety of media due to her writing. Her research interests include gender inequality and resulting outcomes in the security sphere, and her dissertation work involves the role of gender inequality as an enabling condition of terrorism.

Karin Johnston

Blog Editor
Karin Johnston

Blog Editor

Dr. Karin L. Johnston is the editor of the WIIS Global Blog, and a Franklin Fellow in the U.S. Department of State, Bureau of Conflict and Stabilization Operations, supporting the Bureau’s work on conflict prevention and stabilization in conflict-afflicted areas of the world. She is an Adjunct Professor at the School of International Service, the American University, in Washington, D.C. specializing in international politics/international security, foreign policy decision-making, U.S.-European relations/Comparative European Politics, and German foreign and security policy. She has worked in policy research institutes in Washington, D.C., including as Senior Research Associate for the Foreign Policy Program at the American Institute for Contemporary German Studies (AICGS). Johnston has written on German foreign policy decision-making on out-of-area operations, German public opinion during the Bosnian crisis and Iraq, media and politics, religion and foreign policy, and U.S.-German-French relations.

Kayla McGill

Program Manager and Fellow
Kayla McGill

Program Manager and Fellow

Kayla graduated with her Masters of International Affairs from the Bush School of Government and Public Service at Texas A&M in 2018 where she focused on Women, Peace & Security, Diplomacy, and Intelligence. She received her B.A. in Political Science with a minor in Civic Engagement from Brigham Young University. Kayla is a trained Analytical Researcher focusing on gender and national security, culture and narrative studies, Eastern European tribalism, and U.S.-China relations. She has presented her research to The U.S. State Department and The U.S. Institute of Peace and at numerous conferences. Kayla previously worked for the WomanStats Project contributing to publications, working with qualitative and quantitative data, and representing the Project at events such as Beijing+20/CSW59 at the United Nations. Kayla strongly believes in the importance of public service and cultural understanding. She speaks French, has lived in China, Germany, the UK, and France, and has traveled abroad extensively.

Hannah Proctor

Research Fellow
Hannah Proctor

Research Fellow

Hannah Proctor is a Gender and Global Security program assistant. Hannah is a recent graduate from the inaugural MSc in Women, Peace and Security at the London School of Economics. Her dissertation focused on the role of girls' right to education in conflict prevention. Previously, she studied Women's Studies and International Affairs at the University of Georgia. Hannah's research interests include militarized masculinity's connection to sexual violence; the Women, Peace and Security Agenda; and bringing feminist perspectives to sustainable peace. She has experience planning the 2015 Special Olympics World Games, working with a Croatian soccer club developing the Girl's Empowerment Program, and working with low income families in Los Angeles.

Roksana Verahrami

Program Assistant
Roksana Verahrami

Program Assistant

Roksana Verahrami is currently a B.A. candidate in Economic and International Affairs, with a concentration on international development at the George Washington University’s Elliott School of International Affairs. She has previously worked with the Save Darfur movement, studying genocide and the use of sexual violence as a weapon of war. She also worked on some the issues surrounding the ensuing refugee crisis from Sudan into neighbouring countries and abroad and helped organize an annual symposium designed to bring awareness to the situation in Darfur and its impact on women. Her interests also include studying the gendered dimensions of climate change, especially the intersectionality of race and class on these gendered dimensions, analysing the subversion or exploitation of traditional gender roles during times of violence, rebellion and war, and looking at the how religious norms shape gender roles cross-culturally. She has also spent a semester studying at Trinity College Dublin in Dublin, Ireland studying international politics, economics and religion.

Zi Xue

Program Assistant
Zi Xue

Program Assistant

Zi Xue is a Gender and Global Security Program Assistant at Women in International Security (WIIS). She is a current M.A. Candidate in International Relations at Johns Hopkins School of Advanced International Studies (SAIS) with a concentration in International Law and Organizations. Originally from Shanxi, China, she received her B.A. in Political Science with distinction and double minors in Gender Women Sexuality Studies and Studies in Cinema and Media Culture from the University of Minnesota. Zi’s research interests are in the role that international organizations play in international security; the relationship between gender equality and global security; and Foreign policies. She conducted research on the relationship between government policy and cooperate social responsibility in China; healthy food access in the Latino community in Minneapolis; and assisted political campaign for Minnesota State Senate.

Sarah Soliman

Program Assistant
Sarah Soliman

Program Assistant

Sarah Soliman is a Gender and Global Security program assistant at Women in International Security. She is currently a B.A. candidate at American University in the School of International Studies with concentrations in Identity, Race, Gender and Culture and Global Inequality and Development with a minor in Religious Studies. Her research interests include constructions of peace in longstanding conflict, feminist analyses of major works and religious texts, and the involvement of women in peace-building efforts. She recently worked with Samos Volunteers, a psychosocial support center for refugees on the island of Samos, Greece. There she organized activities for women and children to alleviate their stress levels from life on the refugee camp, such as sewing, coding and language classes. She also served as a teacher in Advanced English and Introductory Arabic classes.

Karla Infante

Program Assistant
Karla Infante

Program Assistant

Karla is a WIIS Program Assistant and rising senior at the George Washington University. She is double majoring in International Affairs with a concentration in International Politics and Comparative Political, Economic and Social Systems, and majoring in Women, Gender and Sexuality Studies. Raised in Miami in a European and Dominican household, she learned to value different perspectives and developed a zealous curiosity to explore different cultures and expand her understanding of the world. After her service trips in Bolivia and Haiti, she became interested in advocating for women's rights and combating sexual violence, namely in post-conflict and developing regions. She interned her sophomore spring semester at the Women’s Foreign Policy Group, whereby she facilitated the coordination of events regarding foreign policy. She accomplished to execute an event to discuss the effects of Boko Haram on the Nigerian Diaspora. She is currently doing research on the role of women in drug cartels as well as how drug cartels affect the role of women in society. During the academic year, she serves as the Vice President of GWU's Organization of Latino American Students and a Head Peer Educator for GWU Students Against Sexual Assault.